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Behavioral Health

Assertive Community Treatment

Assertive Community Treatment (ACT) is an evidence based practice model that has consistently demonstrated effectiveness in helping people with mental illness achieve their desired goals. This service delivery model is designed to help adults with serious mental illness who have the highest needs – individuals whose psychiatric disorders impair their ability to function in the community. This includes those likely to interface with the criminal justice system, experience homelessness or substandard housing or have higher than average use of emergency and inpatient services.

Research over the past 30 years has consistently concluded that individuals participating in ACT programs experience the following benefits:

  • Decreased psychiatric hospitalization
  • Increased housing stability
  • Increased individual and family satisfaction

 

Appointments and Referrals

To schedule an appointment or learn more, please contact the MIHS Mesa Riverview ACT at 480-344-2255.

You can self-refer, or contact your Case Manager/Primary Behavioral Health provider.

 

Treatment and Services

The Assertive Community Treatment (ACT) model includes a team approach offering flexible, customized, and time-unlimited services when and where participants want and need them. Services are delivered in the home and community and may include anything ACT participants need, including, but not limited to: substance abuse treatment, medication support, counseling, recovery education, peer support, health promotion, family support and education, housing and employment, skills training and crisis intervention.

ACT program participants have access to a trans-disciplinary team of highly trained professionals, including: a psychiatrist, counselor/social worker, substance abuse specialist, independent living specialist, rehabilitation specialist, employment specialist, peer support specialist, housing specialist, and staff responsible for care coordination and case management.

Services are available 24 hours a day, 7 days per week, 365 days a year.

 

Patient Education

How does ACT work?

A team approach:   Psychiatrists, nurses, mental health professionals, employment specialists, housing specialists, peer support specialists, independent living specialists and substance-abuse specialists join together to work collaboratively with participants; offering ongoing, individualized care.
     
Services provided where they are needed:   Participants take part in ACT services in their homes, where they work and other areas in the community where support is needed.
     
Personalized care:   ACT teams work with relatively small numbers of people.
     
Time-unlimited support:   Services and supports are available for as long as someone needs them, without arbitrary timeframes for completion.
     
Continuous care:   Several ACT team members work regularly with each participant.
     
Flexible care:   ACT teams work their schedules around the needs of participants and are available outside of traditional work hours.
     
Comprehensive care:   ACT teams provide an array of services to help meet participant needs.
     
Services provided when they are needed:   ACT services are available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Someone is always available to handle emergencies.
     

Assertive Community Treatment   

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Research and Resources

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